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Pear IPM Scouting

From March to September 2017, the Pear IPM team scouted 19 pear orchards on a weekly basis for pear psylla, mites, and their natural enemies.  Orchards were managed conventionally, selectively, or organically, and all were located in the Wenatchee River Valley. This information will be used to create an IPM scorecard based on pest and natural enemy numbers.

In the plots below, each dot represents abundance of pests or natural enemies at one site from one date.

Plot 2 – Natural Enemy Abundance Relative to Each Other

For the natural enemies (final 7 lines), the size of the dot is relative to the largest catch average of any species (in this case 115 Campylomma).  In this graph you can compare the population from one site to another.

 

Pear IPM bubble plot 2

Plot 1 – Pest and Natural Enemy Seasonal Abundance

The size of the dot is relative to the highest catch average of the season.  For example, the highest catch for Campylomma was 115 so the largest dot on the Campylomma line represents 115 and all other dots are relative to this.  But for the Nigricornis lacewing the highest average was only 10 and all smaller dots are relative to this.

Pear IPM bubble plot 1

Plot 4 – Comparison of Scouting Methods – Relative Abundance

For the natural enemy categories (Campylomma, Deraeocoris, Lacewings, and Trechnites) the size of the dot is relative to the highest catch average of the season for any species (115 Campylomma) using that scouting method (trap or beat tray).

Pear IPM bubble plot 4

Plot 3 – Comparison of Scouting Methods – Seasonal Abundance

For the natural enemy categories (Campylomma, Deraeocoris, Lacewings, and Trechnites), the size of the dot is relative to the highest catch average of the season for that species using that scouting method (trap or beat tray).

Pear IPM bubble plot 3

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