Information from Dr. Vince Jones, Dr. Ute Chambers, WSU Entomology; and Dr. Jay Brunner, WSU Emeritus. Summarized by Tianna DuPont, WSU Extension. March 2017.

Mating disruption dispensers should be in place before the start of bloom.

Figure courtesy Dr. Vince Jones, WSU Entomology.
Figure courtesy Dr. Vince Jones, WSU Entomology.

Mating disruption floods the orchard with synthetic pheromone, making it harder for the males to find females. The delay in mating of females reduces egg production and the length of the period females can lay eggs.  Mating disruption works best when it is hot because the delay in mating operates on a heat-unit (degree-day) basis. Hotter weather means the delay in mating is greater (so total eggs laid are reduced) and the females age faster, both factors reduce the growth and size of the population.

Although mating disruption is not a stand-alone treatment, it makes all other treatments work better. For example, Dr. Vince Jones, WSU Entomology simulated the effects of a series of management strategies on control efficacy. You can see that all the programs with mating disruption (blue bars) perform much better than the programs without mating disruption (grey bars). For additional examples, see “What Makes an Effective Codling Moth Management Program” on the Decision Aid System (DAS) site.

Additional Information

What Makes an Effective Codling Moth Management Program?

Decision Aid System

How Does Codling Moth Mating Disruption Work?

Contacts

 

Img1426_pp Vince JonesVincent P. Jones, Professor & Entomologist

Department of Entomology, Washington State University
Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, Wenatchee, WA

vpjones@wsu.edu

 

Chambers-Ute_lgUte Chambers, DAS Manager/ Outreach

Department of Entomology, Washington State University

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, Wenatchee, WA

uchambers@wsu.edu

 

Img1380Tianna DuPont, WSU Tree Fruit Extension Specialist

Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, Wenatchee, WA

tianna.dupont@wsu.edu, (509) 663-8181