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Orchard Spraying and Following Label Requirements on Common Tree Fruit Pesticides

Written by Carol Black, Washington State University, Jason Deveau, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs

Compliance with pesticide labels requires managers and applicators to follow pesticide label directions.  The “Directions for Use” section has mandatory language, noted in bold type below, that must be followed to be in compliance with federal and state laws.  Mandatory label language is stated in this fact sheet for three common pesticides; these statements come directly from the label.

Chlorpyrifos* language excerpt from the label

 

Orchard Airblast Application

The following mandatory spray drift best management practices are required to reduce the likelihood of
off-target drift movement from airblast applications.

  • Direct nozzles so spray is not projected above the
    canopies.
  • Apply only when wind speed is 3 to 10 mph at the
    application site as measured by an anemometer
    outside of the orchard/vineyard on the upwind side.
    (WSU recommends applications be made in 3-7 mph winds to increase deposition on the canopy)
  • Outward pointing nozzles must be shut off when
    turning corners at row ends.

Lime Sulfur* language excerpt from the label

 

For airblast applications:

Sprays must be directed into the crop canopy, rather than above the canopy.  Outward pointing nozzles should be turned off at row ends and when spraying outer rows.

TEMPERATURE INVERSION:

If applying at wind speeds less than 3 mph, the applicator must determine if a) conditions of temperature inversion exist, or b) stable atmospheric conditions exist at or below nozzle height. Do not make applications into areas of temperature inversions or stable atmospheric conditions.

 

Mineral Oil* (dormant oil) excerpt from the label

SPRAY DRIFT MANAGEMENT

A variety of factors including weather conditions (e.g., wind direction, wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity).

and method of application (e.g., ground, aerial, or airblast) can influence pesticide drift. The applicator and grower must evaluate all factors and make appropriate adjustments when applying this product. The restrictions pertaining to wind speed, temperature inversions, and droplet size apply to all the methods of application permitted for this product.

WIND SPEED

Do not apply at wind speeds greater than 15 mph at the application site. (WSU recommends 3-7 mph winds)

TEMPERATURE INVERSIONS

If applying at wind speeds less than 3 mph, the applicator must determine if a) conditions of temperature inversion exist, or b) stable atmospheric conditions exist at or below nozzle height. Do not make applications into areas of
temperature inversions or stable atmospheric conditions.

AIRBLAST APPLICATIONS

Turn off outward pointing nozzles at row ends and when spraying outer row. To minimize spray loss over the top in orchard applications, spray must be directed into the canopy.

Don’t Assume Your Sprayer is Adjusted Properly

Learn About Sprayer Set Up and Operation with Airblast 101—A handbook for best practices in Airblast Spraying. It describes best practices in airblast spraying in clear, conversational language.

A FREE downloadable version of Airblast101 is available at http://sprayers101.com/articles/multimedia/airblast101/  This friendly handbook is aimed at airblast sprayer
calibration and configuration.

*Active ingredients were used for review.  Consult WSU Pesticide Information Center Online (PICOL) Database
http://cru66.cahe.wsu.edu/LabelTolerance.html for product names and links to labels.

Contacts

Carol Black, Washington State University, ramsay@wsu.edu, 509-335-9222
Jason Deveau, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs

Fruit Matters articles may only be republished with prior author permission © Washington State University. Reprint articles with permission must include: Originally published by Washington State Tree Fruit Extension Fruit Matters at treefruit.wsu.edu and a link to the original article.

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